TABLE FUNDAMENTALS

A relational database system can contain one or more objects called Tables.

We can store all the database information in these tables.

Tables are identified by their names and consist of Columns and Rows.

  • Columns are a set of data values, they basically define the data in a table,

  • Rows contain the records or data for the columns.

 

Let’s understand it with a simple example. Below is the structure of EmployeeDetail Table.

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Figure5.1. Sample Table EmployeeDetail

The Columns of the Table EmployeeDetail are:

  • EmployeeId,

  • LastName,

  • FirstName,

  • Address,

  • City

These columns will define what all information can be found in our table.

We have five records or five rows in our Table.

Want More SQL Deep Dives

  1. SQL Introduction

  2. Database Overview

  3. Creating a Database

  4. Dropping a Database

  5. Table Fundamentals

  6. Table Typesable Types

  7. Datatypes in SQL

  8. DDL, DML, TCL & DCL

  9. Null & Not Null Values

  10. Creating Tables

  11. SQL - Constraints

  12. SQL - Index 

  13. SQL Inserting Data

  14. SQL Identity Columns

  15. Selecting Data

  16. Using Distinct

  17. SQL in NOT IN

  18. Using Top Clause

  19. Where Clause

  20. Group By

  21. Order By

  22. Having

  23. Exists

  24. Offset

  25. SQL - Operators

  26. Between

  27. Update

  28. Delete

  29. SQL - Aggregate Functions

  30. SQL - Introductions to Joins

  31. Table Alias

  32. SQL - Inner Join

  33. SQL - Left Join

  34. SQL - Right Join

  35. Full Join

  36. Self Join

  37. SQL Union

  38. Pivot

  39. Alter Command

  40. Limit Clause

  41. Truncate

  42. Drop

  43. Table Backup

  44. SQL - Normalization

  45. Subquery

  46. SQL - Views & Materialized Views

  47. Case Statement

  48. SQL Transactions

  49. SQL - Functions

  50. Working with Dates

  51. Grantrevoke

  52. SQL - Performance Tunning

  53. Stored Procedure Basics

  54. Stuffunction

  55. Keyword

  56. SQL - Miscellaneous